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Where the Action Is - Are You Interested?
From the President's Desk (Elaine Vik)
Consensus on U.S. - China Relations
From "Save Diamond Head Association"
Law and the Citizen: a Workshop
Guess What?
Aloha to Our New Members - Eight of Them

Consensus on U.S. - China Relations

WHAT SHOULD BE THE OBJECTIVES OF U.S. POLICY TOWARD THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA?

The U.S. should seek to encourage informative discussion concerning the People's Republic of China. Ignorance breeds fear; attitudes change with access to information.

The U.S. should seek to better relations with the People's Republic of China. The current policy has not been successful. Moreover, Mainland China represents too large a segment of world population to continue to ignore.

DOES YOUR LEAGUE SUPPORT CHANGES IN SPECIFIC U.S. POLICIES? IF SO, IN WHAT DIRECTIONS?

The U.S. should explore the feasibility of adjusting its present policy of embargo against the People's Republic of China. The present policy does not accomplish what was intended, and improved relations can better be achieved by the removal of this source of antagonism. It was suggested: 1.) that the U.S. establish a clear national policy before acting on trade relations, and 2.) that the U.S. encourage trade subject to the same restrictions and rules used in American trade with other Communist nations.

The U.S. should look into the possibility of cultural interchange with the People's Republic of China. whenever it is in our national interest, we should explore the feasibility 'of technical interchange.

The U.S. should reassess its current policies toward the Republic of China and the Offshore Islands and toward the People's Republic of China, giving consideration to the premise that the Republic of China and the People's Republic of China are in fact two independent governments. Thus the U.S. should explore the possibility of some form of recognition of the People's Republic of China. It was also suggested that the U.S. should reconsider its defense of the Offshore Islands. However, a small minority expressed dissent on the issue of recognition of the People's Republic of China.

The U.S. should lessen its active obstruction of the People's Republic of China's admission into the U.N. Her admission into the U.N. would serve to involve her in the world community, which could draw her into the arena of world opinion and perhaps help to strengthen the U.N. Nevertheless, the U.S. should not allow the unseating of the Republic of China from the U.N. A small minority opposed any lessening of active obstruction by the U.S. on the issue of admission of the People's Republic of China into the U.N.

SHOULD THE UNITED STATES TAKE THE INITIATIVE IN RELAXING TENSIONS? PLEASE EXPLAIN.

The U.S. is a great nation wielding much power in world affairs. It can demonstrate the sincerity of its desire for peace and can more effectively discharge its responsibility to work for world peace by exploring various means of relaxing international tensions without fear of loss of face. Viewed in this context, the majority of discussion participants felt that the U.S. should take the initiative to implement the changes in policies discussed above following careful study. A small minority felt that unless the People's Republic of China undergoes a change in attitude, there is little hope of success even should the U.S. take the initiative.

BRIEFLY DESCRIBE THE WAY IN WHICH THE SUBJECT OF U.S. CHINA RELATIONS WAS BROUGHT TO YOUR MEEMBERSHIP AND EVALUATE MEMBERSHIP PARTICIPATION.

Study of U.S.-China relations has extended into its third year. During this period the Foreign Policy Committee arranged for distribution of the four Facts and Issues dealing with China. These, the China Puzzle, and prepared bibliographies printed in our monthly bulletins formed the core of our discussion materials. Prior to discussions, the Committee released agenda tonics and pertinent bibliographic information. Members of the Committee served as resource Persons. Briefing sessions were held with discussion leaders to present the agenda topics to them and to offer hints on guiding and stimulating discussion. The final discussion held before the meeting for reaching consensus was devoted to exploring the issues raised by the consensus questions. These issues were collated and presented to the membership as guidelines for discussion to reach consensus. Participants were encouraged to consider at least these basic issues, all of which had been explored at all unit discussions held just previously. An information sheet, which answered questions raised by members but not answered at meetings, was printed and distributed with the monthly bulletin prior to the discussion for consensus. Participation in discussions was lively and interested. Sixty-nine members, which is an average attendance, were involved in consensus-reaching.

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